Bendigo Advertiser letters to the editor

STOP THE CRUELTY: Letter-writer Glynn Jarrett, of Ravenswood South, says the way humans treat animals is symptomatic of how we treat each other.

STOP THE CRUELTY: Letter-writer Glynn Jarrett, of Ravenswood South, says the way humans treat animals is symptomatic of how we treat each other.

Listen to your conscience

It is great to see how many wonderful causes there are, and among these are three that we read about almost daily; they are domestic violence, climate change, and the prevention of animal cruelty.  

How important it is that we stand up and say no to all forms of domestic violence. There is no place for violence and fear, most especially in the family home.  

And how important it is that we stand up and fight for the wellbeing of our planet. I don't believe for a minute that the scientists have it wrong when we talk about climate change, but even if the scientists are wrong, what can be more important than to work together to protect our only home the planet Earth?

And how heart-warming and wonderful it is to see so many people saying no to animal cruelty. The fight against greyhound racing continues and so many people are horrified and protest about the cruelty we see so often on social media, for example the killing and harvesting of wild dolphins, how bull fighting still exists along with so many other forms of cruelty that happens here and in so many countries.

There are so many people fighting these causes and I admire them, our great activists who are getting far better outcomes than I could ever hope to achieve.  

But there is something that bothers me with so many of these warriors for justice, which is how so many are at the end of the day, are hypocrites.  

If you eat meat, how can you honestly be a voice against violence? Is it good enough to say I object to violence against women and children, but turn a blind eye towards violence against our most innocent beings?  

If you eat meat, how can you honestly fight for the wellbeing of planet Earth, when giving up beef, pork, and diary will reduce the carbon footprint far more than banning cars ever will, and we have known this for decades?  

Agriculture is a significant driver of global warming and causes more than 15 per cent of all emissions, half of which are from livestock.

And just how many of those fighting for an end to animal cruelty will sit down tonight to roast chicken or thick juicy steak?

I write this letter not to say everyone should stop eating meat (in my heart of hearts I hope you do), but for you to just think about just cutting back on your dependence on eating the flesh of animals.

I also write this as a person who has eaten meat all my life. I have even killed and slaughtered sheep and chickens to feed my family, and I have and still love the flavor of meat. But I have now chosen to listen to a little voice that has always spoken to me quietly from some forgotten place in my soul.

Glynn Jarrett, Ravenswood South

A new, crazy world order

My world order is in shambles. Donald Trump is elected despite appalling behaviour. His apologists suggest he may be more moderate in future, reminiscent of the abusive partner who excuses his behaviour by blaming drink or, in Trump's case, the media. It is unacceptable.

Women in high office are personally attacked. Hillary Clinton, Janet Yelland and Gillian Triggs were all dignified in their responses to the onslaughts. Younger aspirants would need a suit of armour to pursue such career paths.

Finally, program cuts at Radio National. RN has been the audio background to my life, educating and entertaining me over decades. I already switch off Tom Switzer because of his conservatism, and Michael Mackenzie for his mindless pap between reheats and leftovers. The axing of the programs of Jonathan Green and Lucky Oceans especially upset me. I do not want to switch to podcasts or continually change stations. I want a return to the intellectual and musical stimulation I love and value.

Where's Howard Beale? Oh that's right, he's fiction. I wish all of the above were also.

Barb Ashworth, Castlemaine

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