Email reveals campaign aim

CAMPAIGN: An anti-Islamic group is behind the black balloons seen across Bendigo

CAMPAIGN: An anti-Islamic group is behind the black balloons seen across Bendigo

Anti-Islamic group behind black balloons

RELATED: Islamic expert responds to group's views

An anti-Islamic group has sent an anonymous email to all Bendigo media outlets, local politicians and prominent media commentators claiming it was behind the black balloons that have mysteriously appeared across central Bendigo.

The email has ended weeks of speculation about what the balloons mean and who is behind them.

The first line of the email states that the "black balloon campaign was established by those who are against the legislated inequality and abuse in our Western society of women and children".

It says Islamic influence, especially in relation to abuse of women and children, is "creeping into our Western culture". 

It says Western communities are being "forced to accept cultures like Islam". 

The final line of the email reads: "The view of the black balloon supporters is to accept Islam into our community is endorsing domestic and child abuse in our community."

The email also says it is a "misconception" that the views expressed are "racist".

Bendigo's Centre for Non-Violence chief executive Margaret Augerinos said the group's views were racist.

"I don’t believe that it’s an acceptable view to hold," Ms Augerinos said. 

Ms Augerinos said it was wrong to single out a particular cultural group.

"We know that violence occurs across all classes and cultures," she said.

She said her organisation provided services to women of all cultural backgrounds.

 "We see men who perpetrate violence from all cultural backgrounds and this is a universal problem that occurs across the world at epidemic rates," she said.

Maya Avdibegovic is the chief executive of Intouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence, a Melbourne-based family violence support service for women and children from migrant families.

"I just find it appalling and I’m really outraged by things like this," Ms Avdibegovic said.

"I think where culture plays a role in this whole issue, is that it adds to the complexity of the issues," she said.

"Culture is never an excuse for violence."

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