Masses obsess over sport as psychiatric services fail

They’re saying it’s the darkest day in Australia’s sporting history, the announcement by the Crime Commission that it has been investigating drugs in sport for a year. 

There’s the problem of “match-fixing”, too.

This is all terrible – sports-people won’t be able to look at each other now without feeling suspicious or paranoid that drugs or “match fixing” may be occurring. 

Fans will be likewise outraged, no longer able to view sport or watch it on TV, confident it’s a bona fide set-up.

This in turn could cause social unrest, because sport now tends to be the religion of the people. 

It would have been far better had the Crime Commission announced it was investigating corruption within the public psychiatric system in Australia and had been doing so for a year. 

This would have immediately taken the pressure off the masses, as the psychiatric system rates as a pretty unpopular topic anyway, and a lot of people just want to dismiss the notion of even ever thinking about it.

With the investigation into mental health psychiatric care, they could say there are “hundreds of millions involved”.

The level of care so low, with gross inadequacies and endemic chronic failure by the system, it’d take that much money just to bring mental health care up to the standard of general health care.

They could say there are chronic problems with the legislated official grievance system, too – that complaints by psychiatric patients and carers are 99 per cent of the time being totally ignored.

All in all most people wouldn’t be bothered about it much at all, and it wouldn’t cause all the fuss and trouble this sport thing is going to.

And even if people didn’t care, you could still say it was then the brightest day for mental health in Australia, and not the darkest like it has been for sport.

Bob Doolan,

Campbells Creek

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