'Into the Aboriginal world' – Victoria's secret emerges from lake and creek

By Chris Johnston
Updated December 30 2016 - 5:08pm, first published 1:15pm
A scarred tree from drying possum skins in Kinpanyial Creek. Photo: Penny Stephens
Paul Haw, Environmentalist and honory caretaker of a huge collection of Aboriginal artifacts. Photo: Penny Stephens
Dja Dja Wurrung descendant Jida Murray Gulpilil is rescuing this tree and donating it to the Boort Hospital. Photo: Penny Stephens

Advertisement

Ad
Jida Murray Gulpilil carries out a smoking ceremony. Photo: Penny Stephens
Jida Murray Gulpilil among the ceremonial scarred trees in Kinpanial Creek. Photo: Penny Stephens
Jida Murray Gulpilil among the ceremonial scarred trees in Kinpanial Creek. Photo: Penny Stephens
Jida Murray Gulpilil near the banks of Lake Boort with some clay balls which were used in cooking like heat beads are today. Photo: Penny Stephens
Jida Murray Gulpilil near the banks of Lake Boort with some clay balls which were used in cooking like heat beads are today. Photo: Penny Stephens

Jida Murray Gulpilil bathes himself in the thick, fragrant smoke from a pile of burning gum leaves beside a creek in the backwoods of northern Victoria. For him this is the smell of home. The past, but also the future.

Advertisement

Ad

Advertisement

Ad

Advertisement

Ad