Lansell Crest housing development in East Bendigo approved by state planning minister

SET TO TRANSFORM: The 2.6 hectare block of empty land between Lansell and Lloyd streets is set to become more than 100 mixed-size homes.
SET TO TRANSFORM: The 2.6 hectare block of empty land between Lansell and Lloyd streets is set to become more than 100 mixed-size homes.

A significant property development in East Bendigo has received ministerial approval, paving the way for Bendigo’s first large-scale medium-density housing project.

The Lansell Crest development passed its final administrative hurdle last week, with planning minister Richard Wynne approving an amendment to the Greater Bendigo planning scheme, which effectively removes the cap on dwelling numbers at the site. 

Approximately 104 units will be built at the 2.6 hectare site at 39-51 Lansell Street, ranging from two to five-bedroom houses, some of which will be triple storey. 

Developer Damien Tangey said he was “very happy the process is now complete”, and was hopeful of having the design phase for the development finalised by the end of 2018.

Mr Tangey did not wish to comment on when building works will begin, or how much the properties will cost.

The development received more than 100 public objections, which the council referred to a state government planning panel. 

The objections focused on the size and close proximity of the proposed lots, along with traffic concerns.  

In supporting the development the panel stated, via a report, that limiting the number of dwellings in the planning overlay would be “inconsistent with the residential policies that apply to the site and is unnecessary in light of the other planning scheme provisions that are adequate to manage its development”.

Bendigo councillors voted in favour of the panel’s findings in a fiery November council meeting.

Councillor James Williams said at the time the site’s proximity to the central business district could help revitalise the area.

“We’ve seen people moving out of the CBD, this is a way of putting people back in that space,” he said.

“Unfortunately some people don’t like it in their backyard but it is a deliberate plan of council. This is the first of a number of developments in the future that will see the city’s construction change.”

Cr Julie Hoskin, speaking on behalf of 100 people who opposed the proposal, said residents felt the development plans were deceptive. 

“I’m not a fan of packing and stacking beehive developments being entertained across Bendigo,” she said.

“It may set a dangerous precedent for the community and be something council might come to regret.”