Zac Sheehan and Vics chase title at National Cricket Inclusion Championships in Geelong

Zac Sheehan is hoping for a successful National Cricket Inclusion Championships in Geelong from Janaury 20-27. Picture: NONI HYETT
Zac Sheehan is hoping for a successful National Cricket Inclusion Championships in Geelong from Janaury 20-27. Picture: NONI HYETT

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A LAIDBACK Zac Sheehan will have no shortage of motivation ahead of the 2018 National Cricket Inclusion Championships in Geelong.

The Bendigo cricketer, who will represent Victoria between January 21 and 27, hopes to make amends for the team’s 2017 grand final loss to a combined South Australia/Western Australia team in the blind and vision impaired section of the championships.

Then there is the matter of spots in the Australian team to tour South Africa later this year being up for grabs.

Sheehan is no stranger to representative cricket.

He has been picked to play for Victoria four times and twice worn the ‘Baggy Green’ of Australia. Once as part of a development team against New Zealand and in early 2016 in blind and vision impaired cricket’s equivalent of the Ashes against England.

While he would undoubtedly jump at the chance to one day be back in the Aussie green and gold, Sheehan insists he is content and forever grateful just to be given the opportunity to play the game he loves so much at any level.

“Everyone at these championships is out there to have some fun,” he said.

“But we also want to win the championships.

“Hopefully I can take a few wickets and make some runs and get back in the Australian squad.”

Sheehan spends his summer playing with St Paul’s in the four-team Victorian Blind Cricket Association competition.

He admits it hasn’t been the best of seasons for a rebuilding and developing Saints, who boast only four players older than 23.

Their to-date winless season comes on the heels of a grand final appearance in 2016-17.

The National Cricket Inclusion Championships includes three divisions: blind and vision impaired; deaf and hard of hearing; and cricketers with an intellectual disability.