Bendigo's Shiralee Bothe scores smashing role at World Masters Games in New Zealand

Shiralee Bothe has scored an ambassadorial role at the World Masters Games in New Zealand. Picture: KIERAN ILES
Shiralee Bothe has scored an ambassadorial role at the World Masters Games in New Zealand. Picture: KIERAN ILES

SHIRALEE Bothe is planning on doing more than acing the opposition at the World Masters Games in New Zealand.

The Bendigo tennis player has been chosen to be an ambassador for the City of Greater Bendigo in Auckland for the March 21-30 games.

She will also feature in Friday's opening ceremony as a World Masters Games Hall of Fame delegate.

Bothe is a former two-time Australian national judo champion, who has traded her judo gi for a tennis racket to participate at this year's games.

She will be joined by nearly 28,000 athletes aged between 25 and 101, who will take part in 28 sports across 10 days.

They include a sprinkling of former Olympians and para-Olympians.

About 5000 officials will also be involved.

Bothe, who is also a former top-level volleyballer, says it is her ambassadorial role for Bendigo that excites her most about her trek to New Zealand.

"As part of my role I will be promoting and marketing Bendigo's resources, cultural and sporting facilities to New Zealand and the world," she said.

"I have also been invited be a hall of fame delegate. 

"This will include marching and having a cultural role in the opening ceremony and meeting officials from international sporting organisations and other key organisations such as  Auckland council."

In-between official duties, Bothe has set her sights on success on the tennis court.

The relief physical education teacher brings plenty of experience to her roles, including stints as a judo and volleyball coach and as a volunteer manager for the Victorian Teachers Games.

Shiralee Bother is hoping the World Masters Games are a smashing success. Picture: KIERAN ILES

Shiralee Bother is hoping the World Masters Games are a smashing success. Picture: KIERAN ILES

The games will be a homecoming of sorts for Bothe, who was born in New Zealand and has links to Maori royalty through her late grandmother Luvinia Healy, who is the daughter of Chief Paoro Toho.

The games are held every four years and will be televised live through New Zealand and internationally via web sites.

Bothe leaves for New Zealand on Wednesday.