Bendigo Advertiser letters to the editor

ENOUGH: Jan Govett, of Epsom, calls for an end to off-shore detention after drunken soldiers assaulted refugees during a violent rampage on Manus Island last week.
ENOUGH: Jan Govett, of Epsom, calls for an end to off-shore detention after drunken soldiers assaulted refugees during a violent rampage on Manus Island last week.

End this ‘disturbing’ policy

All Australians must join church leaders in condemning the violence that erupted on Manus Island on the evening of Good Friday and call for the camp to be evacuated.

The men detained there are now at greater risk of being killed by bullets than they were of drowning in the sea. Offshore detention of people seeking asylum is a disturbing policy of our government. It was designed to pacify the very fears it created in the community in order to win votes. Call on MPs to end off-shore detention now.

Jan Govett, Epsom

Cartoon misses the mark

Absolutely disgusting. That was my first and only reaction. Adam Goodes on the cross of Christ and footballers in Christ's tomb (“Pope’s View”, Bendigo Advertiser, April 15).

It’s bad enough when I see in the paper with the crucifixion of Christ being turned into a political stunt for refugees, with one of the three a pregnant woman (“Refugee policy crucified”, Bendigo Advertiser, April 12). I let that one go through to the keeper. But now it's getting out of control. I am offended that you denigrate my personal saviour into the gimmick that is Adam Goodes nailed to a cross.

If you’re trying to suggest that Jesus and his doctrine will change the attitude of people and make them non-racist – you are correct. However, this is not the way it's done.

Peter Lesuey, Kennington

Climate policy not clever

Malcolm Turnbull desires us to become the “clever country” through application of new technology and innovation arising from a better grasp of science, physics and mathematics; this he says, will fuel job creation.

True, but what is clear is that most politicians themselves need to have a far better understanding of science if they are to advance strong, modern, effective policies relevant to a modern society.

The physics of climate change makes abundantly clear that:

  1. Globally, if we persist with the burning of fossil fuels (in particular coal) the planet will continue to warm resulting in a climate of extreme weather events both in frequency and intensity.
  2. The health of the planet and ultimately our food security depends on all human activities being sustainable.

The giant Queensland Adani mine promoted by both the federal government and the Queensland state government, and supported by the federal Labor Party, satisfies neither of the above criteria.

Environmentalists and scientists are adamant that mine approval represents a ticking time-bomb that will imperil the Galilee Basin and the Great Barrier Reef.

Instead of projecting an image of a progressive “clever country” we will be seen internationally as a country not abreast with modern scientific thinking, a country living in the past, and a country run by politicians whom lack fundamental scientific knowledge.

Whilst Adani proponents claim the creation of 10,000 new jobs, the reality is known to be closer to 1500 jobs as remote-controlled trucks and trains will be used, yet even so such jobs will not satisfy the criteria of sustainability. Further, 70,000 existing sustainable jobs from tourism and other existing reef activities will be at risk as the reef is further degraded.

Ultimately, the fight against Adani’s Carmichael project is about the wisdom of building a massive new coal mine alongside the Great Barrier Reef, a mine which significantly fuels global warming as the rest of the world moves towards less polluting sources of energy.

The issue of climate change is the ultimate political fault line on which environmentalists will fight and a long and protracted fight it will become, with outcomes that inevitably will include a huge upheaval of our political landscape.

Ian Cooper, California Gully