Water moves in the system

Community meetings in flood-affected townships yesterday were “positive” and “calm”, Victorian emergency services have said, as water moves through the state’s river systems to communities living downstream. 

Residents of Charlton, Bridgewater, Newbridge, Serpentine, Donald, Kerang, Quambatook, Carisbrook and Maryborough were among those updated on floods in their neighbourhood throughout Monday.

Speaking after meetings in Charlton and Bridgewater, Bendigo incident control centre public information officer Mark Kelly said the mood had been upbeat. 

“Things are relatively positive and calm, things are just going along,” Mr Kelly said.

“There didn’t appear to be any concerns.” 

The Avoca River’s water level at Charlton had dropped dramatically by Monday morning, falling to 4.15 metres by 9.45am.

It peaked at 7.55 metres on Saturday. 

Water was also receding in Donald, on the Richardson River, Richardson River, down to 3.58 metres early Monday. 

At Quambatook yesterday, water levels remained steady at 1.37 metres, with the Avoca’s peak in the town still to come on Tuesday. 

But even if the Bureau of Meteorology’s prediction of a 2.4-metre river height is reached, that would not see any homes experience over-the-floor inundation. 

Still, emergency services remained in flood-affected communities in case forecast rain changed the situation.  

More than 20 personnel yesterday remained at the Bendigo ICC to co-ordinate the flood response. 

Mr Kelly, a CFA member, said he enjoyed working alongside those from the SES and Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning.  

“It’s gathering intelligence, it’s keeping an eye on river levels and where it’s happening, keeping an eye on future scenarios,” he said.  

It’s gathering intelligence, it’s keeping an eye on river levels and where it’s happening, keeping an eye on future scenarios. - Mark Kelly, Bendigo incident control centre

 “We are all keeping the finger on the pulse.”

Elsewhere, water catchment storage levels continued to climb.

Although it was unlikely to reach its capacity, Eppalock measurements showed the lake was 83 per cent full. 

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop