Students school the education minister

EXPERIMENT: Martin Dixon, Isabelle Todd, Donna Petrovich and Amanda Millar. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

EXPERIMENT: Martin Dixon, Isabelle Todd, Donna Petrovich and Amanda Millar. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

It gave the school community the autonomy to do what they want to with it. - Amanda Millar

STUDENTS have shown Education Minister Martin Dixon all the positives of school life in central Victoria this week.

Mr Dixon, Liberal candidate for Macedon Donna Petrovich and Northern Victoria member Amanda Millar visited three of the region's secondary schools.

Castlemaine, Kyneton and Gisborne schools welcomed the minister to the official gathering.

Castlemaine Secondary College opened stage one of its $7 million well-being centre.

More than 500 students and residents gathered to officially open the centre.

Ms Millar said it was a big development for the area.

"The well-being centre provides a range of facilities for students," she said.

"(It includes) indoor and outdoor sporting facilities, flexible open plan learning spaces, biology and science labs, meeting spaces and a theatrette."

She said the whole day was positive for everyone.

Castlemaine Secondary College students wrote hundreds of postcards to show their appreciation, in anticipation of Mr Dixon's arrival.

The students wanted to thank the minister for his involvement.

Ms Millar said Mr Dixon was "very touched" by the generous act.

She said the building also offered opportunities for the community use.

"It gave the school community the autonomy to do what they want to with it," she said.

Ms Millar said the new year's budget included a $5.5 million allotment for Stage two of the school's re-development.

She said the funding would meet the needs of the school community.

Kyneton Secondary College opened its three updated science buildings.

The government's Veski grant program released grants to science concentrated projects in Victoria.

Three schools shared in a grant of $1 million.

Kyneton Secondary College received $330,000 to update their buildings.

The college's principal Mark Ridgeway said science was a "big thing" for the school.

"This gave us opportunity to push our science curriculum," he said.

"As part of the funding we will use out facilities to build on what the primary schools can use too."

He said the state-of-the-art additions would keep the old feel of the buildings while adding to its capabilities with new facilities.

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