Campaign asks public to live lighter

VICTORIA'S first ever "hard hitting" obesity campaign will aim to reduce fat levels across the state.

LiveLighter, an initiative of the state government, Heart Foundation and Cancer Council, includes television, print and radio advertisements, which deliver messages about the dangers of fat around a person's abdomen. 

City of Greater Bendigo and Bendigo Community Health Services have partnered to deliver the campaign throughout the region, launching on Wednesday. 

Cancer Council prevention division's Craig Sinclair said Bendigo had some of the highest obesity levels in the country and the campaign would help educate people on the importance of health. 

"Campaign's like LiveLighter are about helping to motivate individuals to be better informed about the risks of being overweight and obese, particularly in relation to chronic disease," he said at the launch.   

"We know there is a strong association between obesity and chronic disease, such as Type 2 diabetes, cancer and heart disease."

Mr Sinclair said while the campaign was confronting, it was a true representation of the reality of the issue. 

"When we have two thirds of the population who are overweight or obese and we know there is a strong association between being overweight and obesity and chronic disease, we really need to introduce measures that really make people stop and think," he said. 

"Sure it's confronting but we need to do that to make people think a bit harder about their lifestyle and what things they could be doing to take steps to hopefully introduce a healthier diet and more physical activity into their lives."

City of Greater Bendigo chief executive Craig Niemann said the campaign would complement the work of Healthy Together Bendigo - a local initiative designed to encourage a healthy lifestyle. 

"Everyone can benefit from this campaign and the many resources available," he said.  

"We can always strive to be better versions of ourselves and all information is there to help us lead better lives."

The advertisements are an exact copy of a campaign which started in Western Australia two years ago. 

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