Earth awash with shooting debris

A supermoon shown against a Bendigo street lamp. Picture: JIM ALDERSEY

A supermoon shown against a Bendigo street lamp. Picture: JIM ALDERSEY

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BENDIGO residents will be able to admire a supermoon tonight and may be showered in shooting stars - if its astronomical lottery numbers come good.

Astronomical Society of Melbourne president Cris Ellis said a Perseid meteor shower started started yesterday and would continue until Wednesday.

The only tricky part is, astronomers don't know where in the world it would trickle and where it would pour, he said.

"It can be anything from seeing a few bright streaks to something that's a shower," he said.

Mr Ellis people in some regions of the world may be able to see 10,000 shooting stars per hour, but where that was remained mystery.

"You may get an absolute swag of them," he said.

"Astronomy is a science where there are no guarantees."

He said meteor debris - commonly referred to as shooting stars -  entered the earth's atmosphere at a speed of 10 kilometres per second.

He said the Perseid meteor shower could be viewed between 2am and just before sunrise.

He advised sky-watchers to be patient.

As for the supermoon, Mr Ellis said this phenomena was more straightforward, which occurred frequently.

He said the moon would appear about seven per cent larger than usual because it is closer to the earth and could be seen all night.

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