Designing futures

LEARN: Stephanie Poynter.

LEARN: Stephanie Poynter.

ART: Students observe art.

ART: Students observe art.

TEACH: Melbourne based illustrator Angie Rehe speaking to students. Pictures: BRENDAN McCARTHY

TEACH: Melbourne based illustrator Angie Rehe speaking to students. Pictures: BRENDAN McCARTHY

NEW: Brooke Barnes & Katy Mackley.

NEW: Brooke Barnes & Katy Mackley.

STATUE: Alida Ferrari and Danika Hill.

STATUE: Alida Ferrari and Danika Hill.

More than 50 Year 10 students from two Bendigo schools melded their artistic minds on Thursday.

The LEAP program, administered by RMIT, visited La Trobe University Visual Arts Centre.

Learn, Experience, Access Professions programs aim to demystify the link between school, university and professions.

They spent their day learning and living an artistic life directed by graphic designer, Craig Dunne and fashion illustrator Angie Rehe.

The students came from Eaglehawk Secondary College and Crusoe College.

The day was designed to allow the students to gain insight into a range of design careers.

The day focused on allowing students from lower socio-economic areas to recognise artistic opportunities were as available to them as any other part of society.

Craig Dunne and Angie Rehe presented talks to the students designed to inspire and encourage.

The students were then able to demonstrate more practical areas of art.

The students took part in two practical workshops, designed to coincide with the current exhibitions, The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece and Undressed: 350 years of underwear in fashion.

Bendigo Art Gallery Education Officer Helen Attrill said there was one students who was anxious about attending Bendigo Senior Secondary College next year.

Ms Attrill said the student had completely changed their mind after the workshops.

"They are now focused and quite excited," she said.

Ms Attrill said the program was a special opportunity for the students.

She said it told them you did not "have to have rich parents to succeed" in the arts.

The students said they had learnt a lot about new pathways.

Students also said the program allowed them to demonstrate their creative skills through drawing and rendering.

Ms Attrill said it was about offering opportunities students would not usually get in regional towns.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop