Pushing music boundaries

MUSICIAN: Guitarist Mauricio Carrasco performs "Bug" by composer Arturo Corrales. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

MUSICIAN: Guitarist Mauricio Carrasco performs "Bug" by composer Arturo Corrales. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

International musicians to bring exploratory sounds to Bendigo

THE strange and inventive sounds of the latest in music composition will be showcased at the Bendigo International Festival of Exploratory Music on the first weekend of September.

In its second year, BIFEM remains Australia's newest international music program. 

Festival director and founder David Chisolm said there were 23 different works coming from across the world.

Mr Chisholm listed a few of the ensembles he was most excited about.

Eine Brise by Argentinian composer Mauricio Kagel is a whimsical piece inviting the general community to be involved. Anyone who owns a bicycle is invited to take part by ringing their bell, whistling and making swishing noises. 

"It's a really fun easy little project for people to get involved in," Mr Chisholm said.

He said Bendigo had a great cycling community and the event was a great way to bring cyclists into the exploratory music community. "Cyclists can actually register. We have a rehearsal the weekend before with five different modules they need to learn," he said.

We enjoy surprising people who come from far bigger cities than ours. - David Chisholm

The Australian Premier of Karlheinz Stockhausen's Sirius will be performed at the Bendigo Tafe Library. Mr Chisolm said it was a 95-minute "modern mystery play wrapped in a science fiction fantasy" featuring a bass baritone singer, soprano, bass clarinetist, a trumpeter and eight-channel surround sound. 

Another piece called Kinecticut will involve four people performing naked with laptops. The laptops will be the only source of light in the theatre.  

He said the festival would showcase at least six international premiers.

"Bendigo has come a long way in the last 10 years and much of our progress and growth is due to our investment in developing a competitive strength as a city," Mr Chisholm said.

"We enjoy surprising people who come from far bigger cities than ours.

"And this has not happened by accident. It is because we have been confident, courageous and pushed the boundaries of what is typical.

"The festival is unique. It has been developed for Bendigo."

Mr Chisholm said there would be free performances and paid events would range between $5 and $30 per ticket.

He said costs were kept low because the festival had a strong patrons program. 

"It's less than going to the cinema," he said. 

"It’s not elitist at all, a lot of music gets classed as elitist because its expensive."

To book tickets and learn more about the festival, visit bifem.com.au.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop