Have your say about cycling-related road rules

UPDATE, 4.36PM: Bendigo International Madison secretary Rick McCaig is encouraging people to take part in the survey.

"It has to be a good thing," he said.

"If they get the information then they make the changes as need.

"I think there's faults on both sides - some motorists have terrible attitudes and so have some cyclists.

"If we can just get everyone on the same page then it will make a big difference."

Mr McCaig has his fingers-crossed a positive outcome will be reached.

"Some people have very strong opinions and to get the information would be good and hopefully there can be a compromise in the middle," he said. 

EARLIER: 

BENDIGO cyclists have welcomed the chance to have their say on future directions for cycling-related road rules.

The state government will survey the public over the next month about its knowledge of cycling-related road rules and its attitudes about interaction between people in vehicles and on bikes.

The results, from a VicRoads online survey that will run until July 27, will be used to inform a review of the state’s cycling-related road rules.

Bendigo cyclist Russell Nankervis said the survey was a good opportunity to gauge public opinion about how public opinion about how motorists and cyclists ought to share the road.

"It's probably the best way that you could get a good representation from both sides," he said.

Mr Nankervis said definitely consider taking part in the survey.

"Being a cyclist you're probably going to already be a bit of a minority in the report so the more the better," he said.

Mr Nankervis said Bendigo had a well-established cycling community and motorists were generally good but there was still some work to be done.

"There are still things like people passing on double lines, around blind corners and just not having any sort of consciousness of the fact they're passing what is essentially another sort of vehicle," he said.

"But Bendigo is pretty good and we have pretty well defined cycling routes around town."

Roads Minister Terry Mulder said the government was launching the survey because it wanted to understand more about where gaps exist in the knowledge of road rules, and to hear about the problems drivers, cyclists and pedestrians want to see fixed.

“We know cyclists and drivers often don’t see eye to eye and there have been a number of incidents where cars and bikes come into conflict because people are not sure who is in the right,” Mr Mulder said. 

“We believe this is partly caused by a lack of understanding and knowledge, by both groups, of the rules that apply.’’

To complete the survey visit www.roadsafety.vic.gov.au 

- with The Age

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